Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

On Landing My First Job in the Business on Martin Scorsese's 'Mean Streets'

Thompson on Hollywood By Nancy Nigrosh | Thompson on Hollywood November 26, 2013 at 6:55PM

Ex-literary agent and writing consultant Nancy Nigrosh looks back at landing her first job in the film business, on Martin Scorsese's "Mean Streets."
9
Harvey Keitel in 'Mean Streets'
Harvey Keitel in 'Mean Streets'

Marty stared at me and said, "This girl? She’s… tall. I mean look at her. Look at me…. Look at her." Just as directed, the entire room fell silent, looking at me. Marty threw up his hands, shaking his head. With that, he left the room. 

I felt my feet move to follow him to another part of the suite, where someone was on the phone with "the coast." Then it hit me that all these people were here from California, a place I’d never been. All around were sketches of scenes from the film they were making.  Marty sat down at a nearby desk. Instinctively I sat down and said, "I don’t have to be tall."

He grinned and said, "that’s good." He showed me some of his sketches. They were very specific. He explained how he wanted the continuity notes to be, since he’d be referring to them in the editing room in California. "So, you think you can do this?" he asked. 

"Yes, I can," I nodded. 

Then we both stood up. The disparity in our heights threw him again. "Okay," he said, sounding as if inspiration had just struck. He threw his shoulders forward as if to model a dance move or do a James Cagney imitation. 

Instinctively I followed his lead. I gently hunched in his direction. He beamed, "Yeah, that’s good."

We spent the next ten days strategically focused like our lives depended on it. Rest was something the rest of the world did. We filmed in Little Italy, one step ahead of the teamsters, since we were a non-union shoot. The local cops watched out for us. One night, Marty’s mom, Catherine, acted in a scene. A restaurant in Marty’s old neighborhood opened its doors at 3am and treated us to the meal of our lives.

Marty was patient and kind. Only once did I truly fuck up. In one scene Robert De Niro was holding a gun. In the middle of shooting he switched hands. I shouted in a panic, "The gun needs to be in your other hand!" Needless to say, I made the man angry. De Niro stepped out of the scene. He walked up to me. "Please don’t do that," he said in that soft voice that made you feel you had his complete attention and you wondered if maybe that wasn’t a good thing. Then he walked back into the scene, as though nothing had happened.

On our last day, we were shooting at night in an old cemetery, a stone’s throw from an apartment building where a party scene was being staged above us. This was an exterior pick up shot of the action inside through the window. I got to stretch out and rest. Earlier in the evening the crew had given me flowers because it was my birthday. I plopped onto the cold ground, leaned up against one of the thin granite tombstones with the flowers, my shooting script now fat with notes to Marty, my stop watch around my neck, looked up at the moon and thought, "So this is the film business. Wonder if anyone will ever see his little movie." The rest, as they say, is history.

This article is related to: Features, Features, Classics, Martin Scorsese, Martin Scorsese, Nancy Nigrosh


E-Mail Updates