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'Palo Alto,' Now on iTunes/VOD, Plants First-Timer Gia Coppola Firmly in the Family Business

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood August 8, 2014 at 1:03PM

"Palo Alto," the impressive debut of 27-year-old filmmaker Gia Coppola, toured the fest circuit, from Venice and Telluride to Toronto, Tribeca and San Francisco, where grandfather Francis turned out, before hitting theaters earlier this year and becoming a modest hit. Now it's on iTunes/VOD.
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'Palo Alto'
'Palo Alto'

"Palo Alto," the impressive debut of 27-year-old filmmaker Gia Coppola, toured the fest circuit, from Venice and Telluride to Toronto, Tribeca and San Francisco, where grandfather Francis turned out, before hitting theaters earlier this year and becoming a modest hit. Now it's on iTunes/VOD.

Yet another dark high school drama in "Kids" mode centered on a group of teens with a penchant for finding trouble, "Palo Alto" is adapted from a book of short stories by James Franco, who produced and stars as the predatory coach of a girl's soccer team. Gia Coppola has a strong visual eye for telling details and handles her young stars well, among them a poised Emma Roberts ("American Horror Story," daughter of Eric and niece of Julia), who holds the screen, and debuting actor Jack Kilmer, son of Val. (His father has a distracting cameo, along with Gia's mother Jacqui Getty, who raised Gia after her father Gian-Carlo died in a boating accident before she was born, great aunt Talia Shire and grandpa Francis, who provides some narration.) The adult actors are not as authentic and convincing as the kids. 

Emma Roberts in "Palo Alto."
Emma Roberts in "Palo Alto."

Gia Coppola sat down with me to speak about her debut feature at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival, along with stars Roberts and Nat Wolff, as part of a series of talks hosted at the Apple Store in SoHo. (The complete iTunes podcast and video are here.)


Coppola grew up in LA, starting out as a photographer, helping on the sets of Sofia's movies, and moving into fashion shorts. She got to know Franco, sending him her photographs. He developed this movie with her based on two short stories that she admired the most. "He took me through it step by step and trusted me," she says.

Rather than lean on her family, who she credits for exposing her to many things, she instead learned from producer/star Franco, who supported her efforts to make the film for five years as she "filled in the blanks working with the short stories," she says. "This was James' book and his production company, so I got the luxury to lean on him and have his support. James guided me though this. I wanted to figure it out on my own and make my own mistakes."

Zooey Deschanel and Gia Coppola
Zooey Deschanel and Gia Coppola

Coppola made a screenplay for each one of the stories; Franco suggested that she make a test short with her friends to hear the dialogue off the page and see what was working and not. During that process, she says, "I discovered the best way to tell the story was to make it more of an ensemble piece to fit for the screen. He gave me a lot of freedom to go and have my own interpretation. That's what he wanted. He was very supportive, when I needed it. He's one of my favorite actors and I wanted him to play a part, but I was too afraid to ask. It was weird, I had to at least try, and he said 'yes.'"


The film is inspired by such teen classics as "The Last Picture Picture Show," "American Graffiti," 'Sixteen Candles" and "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," says Coppola, but getting it made was "really difficult, it's been five years since we've been planning it. There were a lot of obstacles in the way. People didn't want to invest in someone who hadn't made anything, that was young. James stuck by my side and believed in me and waited until we figured it out."

This article is related to: Gia Coppola, Palo Alto, VOD, VOD/Streaming, New On VOD


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Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.