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Paul Walker's Car Clocked 100 MPH, Per Coroner

Thompson on Hollywood By Anne Thompson and Beth Hanna | Thompson on Hollywood January 3, 2014 at 2:38PM

The coroner's report has come in for the untimely death of 40-year-old actor Paul Walker, who was killed in a car crash shortly after Thanksgiving last year. The report finds that the car in which Walker was riding as a passenger exceeded speeds of 100 miles per hour at the time of the crash.
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Paul Walker

The coroner's report has come in for the untimely death of 40-year-old actor Paul Walker, who was killed in a car crash shortly after Thanksgiving last year. The coroner finds that the car in which Walker was a passenger exceeded speeds of 100 miles per hour at the time of the crash.

No drugs or alcohol were involved in the accident; the cause of death is sited as traumatic and thermal injuries, related to the impact of the crash into a tree and the subsequent fiery explosion of the vehicle.

Universa limmediately shut down production on the seventh "Fast & Furious" installment which was in mid-production as the studio and filmmaker James Wan (taking over from Justin Lin) figured out how to continue production on the lucrative franchise following star Walker's death. He had shot about half of his scenes. In mid-December, Universal and producer/star Vin Diesel announced that they would proceed with the race car actioner--which will include Walker's character--with the release date moved back to April 10, 2015 (it was originally slated for a July 2014 opening).

In the wake of a postponement in mid-production due to the death of actor Paul Walker in a Valencia car crash on November 30, Universal Pictures is moving "Fast and Furious 7" from July 11, 2014, to Friday, April 10, 2015.

This article is related to: News, Paul Walker, Fast and Furious, News


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.