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Rush Hour 3 Review: Ratner Winds Up Action Comedy Trilogy

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood August 2, 2007 at 9:41AM

I was agreeably surprised by Brett Ratner's action-comedy Rush Hour 3, but given that it was threequel I wasn't expecting much. This time Ratner drops the bickering fish-out-of-water duo Chan and Tucker into Paris and gives Chan more comedy and Tucker more action, with entertaining results. It will do very well, although the competition in the next couple weeks from the likes of Bourne Ultimatum and Superbad is as intense as any period all summer.
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Rushhour320070417155509990001I was agreeably surprised by Brett Ratner's action-comedy Rush Hour 3, but given that it was threequel I wasn't expecting much. This time Ratner drops the bickering fish-out-of-water duo Chan and Tucker into Paris and gives Chan more comedy and Tucker more action, with entertaining results. It will do very well, although the competition in the next couple weeks from the likes of Bourne Ultimatum and Superbad is as intense as any period all summer.

Here's the just-posted Variety Rush Hour 3 review. And here's my feature on Ratner, for which I explored his surprisingly tasteful Benedict Canyon house, Hilhaven, including the famous Alan Carr discotheque in his basement (it's a small orange-mirror-lined bar with a small dance floor and banquets), and had lunch with the man, who is fun to talk to, at his fave hangout The Ivy.

Superbad

I finally saw the Judd Apatow production Superbad last night, which is comparably fresh and energetic. Could anyone have milked the Rush Hour 3 franchise any better than Ratner? No. But Superbad is new and brash and will be this generation's American Grafitti. (The industry exec I saw it with thinks Superbad will outperform Apatow's own Knocked Up.) Like the teens in Superbad, Nora is having the most socially intense summer of her life en route to college this fal; she's dying to see the movie. And she's packing her DVD sets of Apatow's Freaks and Geeks and Undeclared to take with her.

[Originallya appeared on Variety.com]

This article is related to: Reviews, Stuck In Love, Genres, Directors, comedy, Critics


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.