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Sundance Winner 'Violeta Went to Heaven' Goes to Kino Lorber [Trailer]

Thompson on Hollywood By Sophia Savage | Thompson on Hollywood August 16, 2012 at 5:11PM

"Violeta Went to Heaven," winner of Sundance's World Cinema Dramatic Jury Prize, will be released in North America by Kino Lorber later this year. The film, from Andrés Wood, tells the story of legendary musician, folksinger and poet Violeta Parra. A full synopsis and the trailer are below. Kino Lorber's Richard Lorber states, "Although [Violeta] is not a household name here, her story is poignantly universal and enhanced by her phenomenal music throughout; she's sort of the Edith Piaf of Latin America. North America audiences on seeing Violeta will be in heaven too."
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Violeta Went to Heaven
'Violeta Went to Heaven'

"Violeta Went to Heaven," winner of Sundance's World Cinema Dramatic Jury Prize, will be released in North America by Kino Lorber later this year. The film, from Andrés Wood, tells the story of legendary musician, folksinger and poet Violeta Parra. A full synopsis and the trailer are below.

Kino Lorber's Richard Lorber states, "Although [Violeta] is not a household name here, her story is poignantly universal and enhanced by her phenomenal music throughout; she's sort of the Edith Piaf of Latin America. North America audiences on seeing Violeta will be in heaven too."

After a November or December theatrical release, the film will be available on VOD early 2013. "Violeta Went to Heaven" is also debuting in NYC this week at part of the Film Society of Lincoln Center's Latinbeat film series.

Tracing the evolution of an iconic woman, from an impoverished childhood to international sensation, VIOLETA WENT TO HEAVEN captures the ups and downs of a life that both transformed and propelled Latin American music during the 20th century.
 
Directed by Andrés Wood (Machuca, Football Stories) and scripted by Eliseo Altunaga (Machuca, Matias Lira's Drama) the film also traces Violeta's many political struggles, including her work to protect indigenous cultures and her transformation into a political inspiration for millions of citizens in the continent. One of her most famous songs, "La Carta," was written in support of her brother's arrest and incorporated, like much of her work, indigenous rhythms.
 
"Gracias a la Vida," considered by many her absolute masterwork, was covered by Mercedes Sosa, Joan Baez and many other artists across the globe; it continues to be one of the most covered songs in Latin America.

This article is related to: Violeta Went to Heaven, Kino Lorber, News


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