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Thompson on Hollywood

Ava Gardner Loves That Man: Show Boat

For your pleasure, here's Ava Gardner (dubbed by Annette Warren) singing Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II's "Can't Help Lovin' Dat Man of Mine" from the 1951 musical Show Boat. Ella Fitzgerald, Liza Minnelli, Barbra Streisand, Lena Horne and Judy Garland all covered this, and Helen Morgan made it famous in the original 1927 Broadway show. But Gardner singing in the context of the movie is sublime. (Gardner's voice wound up on the soundtrack album of the film Show Boat, but not in the film itself.) She's playing a character passing for white who could have been played by Horne, but wasn't.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • July 27, 2011 2:45 AM
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  • 6 Comments

Comic-Con: Snow White and The Huntsman Details Arrive, Dueling Theron and Stewart, Gritty Images

We've been tracking the dueling Snow Whites and herewith share more details on Universal's Snow White and the Huntsman revealed by the filmmakers and cast at Comic-Con, along with some pre-production images and footage.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • July 24, 2011 2:22 AM
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  • 8 Comments

Comic-Con: Relativity's The Raven: Cusack on Psychology of Godfather of Goth Edgar Allen Poe

The Raven trailer, which premiered at Friday's Relativity panel, looks very commercial, very Sherlock Holmes, but with less humor and more of the gothic gore that goes with Edgar Allen Poe. The Hall H panel featured director James McTeigue (V for Vendetta), John Cusack (who plays Poe), Luke Evans (Inspector Emmit Fields) and Poe's romantic interest, Emily (Alice Eve). McTeigue compared the film's tone to Misery and Se7en; Cusack called Poe "the Godfather of Goth." Cusack also noted that he "saw some of Hunter S. Thompson in Poe..the unflinching ability to delve into the abyss."
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • July 23, 2011 3:36 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Academy Silents Series Draws Crowds

What works in theater programming is creating events, whether it's talent Q & As (Errol Morris and Tabloid subject Joyce McKinney have been drawing crowds) or rarely-screened classics at LACMA, which drew good numbers for its French films The Earrings of Madame De last weekend followed by Saturday's double feature of Robert Bresson's Pickpocket and Jacques Demy's Bay of Angels starring a dazzling Jeanne Moreau as a bad girl gambling her way around the French Riviera. Even dusty silents can be a a draw, reports Cari Beauchamp:"The Summer of Silents," currently mid-way through its eight weeks series at the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, has been an incredible success. The public programs at the Academy are always impeccably curated, but screening the Photoplay Best Film award-winners from 1920 to 1928 was risky during a summer of 3-D Transformers and the last Harry Potter. Yet every Monday, around 1,000 people have filled the Goldwyn auditorium on Wilshire to be entranced by classics accompanied by music, usually live and always elevating. (A trove of music for silents was recently unearthed.)
  • By Cari Beauchamp
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  • July 17, 2011 8:44 AM
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  • 1 Comment

Marilyn Monroe Blows Up Big in Chicago

Marilyn Monroe's dress in Seven Year Itch recently sold at auction for $4.6 million, and now her iconic image standing over a subway grate is on view as a giant sculpture in Chicago. Check out every angle of the 26-foot Seward Johnson sculpture in this full slide show and here.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • July 17, 2011 4:00 AM
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  • 1 Comment

Academy to Archive Alamo Drafthouse/Mondo's Original Movie Posters

Austin exhibitor Alamo Drafthouse/Mondo is teaming with the Academy's Margaret Herrick Library to archive their collection of original film posters created by graphic artists, which they've been producing since 2003.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • July 11, 2011 6:01 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Will Transformers 3-D Make Room for Crass Horrible Bosses, Dopey Zookeeper or Quality Indie Fare?

Don't go looking at your local multiplex for class this weekend. Raunch and dopiness and Transformers in 3-D still reign. We round up Horrible Bosses reviews here, best summarized by Rex Reed of the New York Observer: "It's one of those revolting, raunch-fueled movies churned out in their sleep by the Farrelly brothers and Judd Apatow that I usually hate, but with real cleverness, off-center wit and edgy imagination," although it has also been declared guilty of "murdering its own potential."
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • July 7, 2011 3:45 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Malcolm McDowell Talks Lindsay Anderson, A Clockwork Orange, Gets Maine Fest Career Award

Malcolm McDowell, 67, has been on the PA circuit of late, scooping up award tributes and riding the PR swell for the 40th anniversary Blu-ray release of my favorite Stanley Kubrick film, 1971's A Clockwork Orange and Antoine de Gaudemar and Michel Ciment's doc Once Upon a Time… Clockwork Orange. They both screened at Cannes, where McDowell taught a master class.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • July 6, 2011 1:22 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Silent Masterpiece Sunrise Boasts New Score: For a Single Guitar

When German director F.W. Murnau subtitled his 1927 silent film Sunrise with the phrase “a song of two humans,” he almost certainly meant those words to be understood figuratively. In a few weeks, though, Paolo Cherchi Usai, an Italian film archivist and director, and Giovanni Spinelli, an Italian-born composer based in New York City, will premiere a project they have been working on for the last two years that will change that subtitle, quite literally, to “a song of one human.”
  • By Jacob Combs
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  • July 4, 2011 5:26 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Breakfast at Tiffany's Celebrates 50 Years with New Digital Restoration Screening, July 29

Fresh from its world-premiere showing at the TCM Classic Film Fest, the 50th anniversary new digital restoration of romantic comedy-drama Breakfast at Tiffany's will screen on Friday, July 29 at 7:30 pm at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater. The Blake Edwards film adaptation of Truman Capote's novel has been a favorite ever since Audrey Hepburn first appeared as Holly Golightly. The movie may be dated (see Mickey Rooney), but Hepburn's Golightly isn't. "People don't belong to people," she tells smitten George Peppard.
  • By Sophia Savage and Anne Thompson
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  • June 29, 2011 12:29 PM
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  • 4 Comments

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