Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

Blogroll

Thompson on Hollywood

London Critics' Circle Film Awards Go to '12 Years a Slave,' Blanchett, Ejiofor and More (FULL WINNERS LIST)

Across the pond, the London Film Critics' Circle unveiled their picks for the best films and performances of the year at a black tie ceremony on Sunday. The awards anticipated a few likely Oscar winners -- "12 Years a Slave" and Cate Blanchett -- while doling out a few surprises, including Oscar nominee for Barkhad Abdi ("Captain Phillips") for best supporting actor.
  • By Ryan Lattanzio
  • |
  • February 3, 2014 11:38 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

London Film Fest Closes with Deep Blue Sea, Awards for Ramsay's Kevin, Herzog's Into the Abyss

London Film Fest Closes with Deep Blue Sea, Awards for Ramsay's Kevin, Herzog's Into the Abyss
Matt Mueller reports back on the final day and winners of the BFI London Film Festival:The BFI London Film Festival bowed out last night with the European debut of Terence Davies’ The Deep Blue Sea, wrapping up after 16 days, the unspooling of 207 fiction and documentary features and a smattering of Hollywood stars on hand to unveil their projects in front of the UK capital’s cinema-devouring crowd. George Clooney graced the LFF red carpet two nights running for the gala premieres of The Ides Of March and The Descendants. Also putting in red-carpet tours of duty were Keira Knightley, Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortensen for A Dangerous Method, Woody Harrelson for Rampart, Joely Richardson and Roland Emmerich for Anonymous, Madonna for W.E., Freida Pinto for Trishna and Seth Rogen for 50/50.
  • By Matt Mueller
  • |
  • October 28, 2011 8:24 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments

London Film Fest Reviews of New Brit Flicks: Hunky Dory, The Awakening, Wild Bill Are Winners

London critic Matt Mueller finds three winners among the smattering of new Brit films unspooling at the London Film Fest. This year’s London Film Festival has played host to more than a dozen new British features, several of them world premieres. Many fall under the banner of the grim and uncompromising but instantly forgettable social-statement tracts that too many British filmmakers seem in thrall to, as if making your feature an unpleasant ordeal is the ultimate arbiter of artistic success. This year’s entries include Sket, a tiresomely misogynistic urban gang drama, and Junkhearts, the bitter tale of an ex-British soldier suffering from post-traumatic stress (Eddie Marsan) who takes a homeless girl (Candese Reid) into his flat with punishing consequences. Far more effective despite its disturbing subject matter was Dreams Of A Life, Carol Morley’s fascinating drama-documentary about a young woman whose dead body lay undiscovered in her London flat for three years. It’s a heartbreaking work that poses profound questions about modern life.
  • By Matt Mueller
  • |
  • October 26, 2011 6:27 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

London Fest Opening Night: 360 is “Love Actually… without the laughs," Saatchi Fete Ends Early

Matt Mueller reports from the opening night of the London Film Festival, which ended too early for his taste:
  • By Matt Mueller
  • |
  • October 13, 2011 10:44 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

London Film Festival: Sandra Hebron Steps Down, Looks Back

As Sandra Hebron’s reign as Artistic Director at the London Film Festival draws to a close, Matt Mueller asked her cast an eye over her final program and look back over her time steering Europe’s largest public film festival.After nine years holding the London Film Festival (LFF) reins (she stepped up from deputy in 2003), well-regarded Sandra Hebron decided that this year’s festival – its 55th edition – would be her last. The decision was partly foisted upon her as she opted not to apply when the British Film Institute declared their intention to merge her post with that of the artistic director of BFI Southbank (the old National Film Theatre). It’s not that Hebron didn’t fancy the added workload, more that it just seemed the right time to make a clean break. “I’ve been here a long time and I’m genuinely interested to see what somebody else does with the festival,” she says. “I’m a big believer in cultural renewal.”
  • By Matt Mueller
  • |
  • October 10, 2011 2:00 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

BFI London Film Fest To Close with Terence Davies' Deep Blue Sea, Starring Weisz & Hiddleston

BFI London Film Fest To Close with Terence Davies' Deep Blue Sea, Starring Weisz & Hiddleston
The BFI London Film Festival, in its 55th year, will close its fifteen-day festival (October 12-27) with the UK premiere of Terence Davies' The Deep Blue Sea. Rachel Weisz, Tom Hiddleston and Simon Russell Beale star in the intense 50s drama, which will premiere in September in Toronto. Based on Terence Rattigan's play (here's a 1998 NYMag review), Weisz plays Hester Collyer, the wife of a high court judge (Beale), who leaves him for her lover (Hiddleston), an ex-RAF pilot...
  • By Sophia Savage
  • |
  • August 30, 2011 3:50 AM
  • |
  • 2 Comments

Meirelles' 360 To Open London Film Festival, What Will Close?

Fernando Meirelles’ 360 will be the opening night film at the 55th BFI London Film Festival, which will be the last under the stewardship of artistic director Sandra Hebron. Meirelles has history with the LFF – The Constant Gardener opened the festival in 2005 – although many Brit pundits had been expecting Hebron to unveil a world premiere to crown her final year. But that’s never been a major motivation for the LFF’s extremely popular head when it comes to programming Europe’s largest non-competitive film festival. Although the 2009 festival opened with a splashy world premiere for The Fantastic Mr. Fox, last year’s LFF debutante was Never Let Me Go, which bowed first in Toronto. The same will go for 360.
  • By Matt Mueller
  • |
  • August 24, 2011 7:46 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Oscar Talk: Foreign Race, Harry Potter, London Fest, Blue Valentine, All Good Things, Black Swan

Oscar Talk: Foreign Race, Harry Potter, London Fest, Blue Valentine, All Good Things, Black Swan
This week, Kris Tapley and I engaged in Oscar Talk via Skype across the Pond with London Film Festival attendees Guy Lodge (In Contention) and Peter Knegt (indieWIRE). We dug into the foreign Oscar race, the NC-17 Blue Valentine controversy, Oscar chances for Black Swan, All Good Things and Never Let Me Go, why documentaries, sequels and animation face tough going getting into the top ten, and what the award season could hold for must-see five-hour marathon Carlos.
  • By Anne Thompson
  • |
  • October 15, 2010 4:14 AM
  • |
  • 3 Comments

Exclusive Clip: Never Let Me Go

Exclusive Clip: Never Let Me Go
Pre-Toronto, we're happy to reveal a new, exclusive clip of Never Let Me Go (here's TOH's positive review). Director Mark Romanek and writer Alex Garland's adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro's novel features Carey Mulligan, Keira Knightley and Andrew Garfield as students of Hailsham boarding school, a mysterious institution set in an alternative past in Britain. The three struggle to define their existence and the nature of love after being confronted with a dark destiny.
  • By Cameron Carlson
  • |
  • September 9, 2010 2:59 AM
  • |
  • 1 Comment

London Film Festival Announces Lineup

From October 13 through 28 the 54th London Film Festival will screen 197 features and 112 shorts hailing from over 67 countries. Mark Romanek's Never Let Me Go will open the fest, and he will be the subject of one of the Screen Talks, along with Darren Aronofsky, whose Black Swan will also screen. Among the seventy American features playing are Derek Cianfrance's Sundance/Cannes holdover Blue Valentine [pictured], Tony Goldwyn's Conviction, Kelly Reichardt's Meek's Cutoff, Aaron Katz's Cold Weather and Danny Boyle's 127 Hours (which will close the festival). The festival is broken into several programs; Gala Screenings (The King's Speech), Film On The Square (Jean-Luc Godard's Film Socialisme and Chad's A Screaming Man), New British Cinema (Gilian Wearing's debut Self Made), French Revolutions (Guillaume Canet's Little White Lies with Marion Cotillard and Lola Doillon's In Your Hands with Kristin Scott Thomas), Cinema Europa (Eva Green in Womb), World Cinema (Michael Rowe's Cannes Camera d'Or winner Leap Year), Treasures From The Archive (Edward Yang's [Scorsese's World Cinema Foundation] A Brighter Summer Day), and Experimenta (Sharon Lockhart's feature Double Tide). On September 28, the fest will announce the award shortlist.
  • By Sophia Savage
  • |
  • September 8, 2010 5:51 AM
  • |
  • 0 Comments

Email Updates