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Thompson on Hollywood

Oscar Watch: King's Speech, Firth, Bening Lead Gurus 'o Gold Poll

The Gurus 'O Gold will now be voting every week as the awards season picks up steam. The latest votes reflect where the Oscar race stands now, with consensus on the top six, led by The King's Speech, which played better for my Sneak Previews class than anything else has in five years of programming. We also voted on actor and actress.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • November 5, 2010 3:43 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Oscar Watch: Director/Picture Splits, Black Swan Promo

Oscar Watch: Director/Picture Splits, Black Swan Promo
- What are the odds of a director winning an Oscar without their film? LAT's new Awards Tracker blog considers the importance of the best director and best picture unity. "Over the past 20 years, the awards for best picture and director split only four times. That's 80% overlap," notes Tom O'Neil, pointing out that being "overdue" is a big factor. Could this happen with Darren Aronofsky (Black Swan), Christopher Nolan (Inception) or and Peter Weir (The Way Back)?
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • November 5, 2010 3:06 AM
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  • 3 Comments

Oscar Wrap: Blue Valentine's Gosling, Dive-Bombing 127 Hours, Best Actress Death Match

Blue Valentine star Ryan Gosling not only talks to Crazy, Stupid, Love co-star Steve Carell, but self-mockingly poses in tight leather in the rain for Interview Magazine. On his past Oscar nomination for Half Nelson, he says: "it feels weird…not that long ago that I was on a TV show called Young Hercules in which I had a fake tan and wore tight leather pants and fought imaginary monsters." As for working on the smaller indie films he loves, the downside is that "when you’re making them, you’re pretty sure no one’s going to see them," he notes---unless they get a nomination: "[it] in some way affirms those choices by making it possible for people to hear about a film and maybe see a movie they wouldn’t have otherwise seen."
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • October 28, 2010 7:55 AM
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  • 4 Comments

Trailer and Oscar Watch: Rabbit Hole, Kidman, on Road to Awards

Trailer and Oscar Watch: Rabbit Hole, Kidman, on Road to Awards
It's all in the Lionsgate trailer (below). Toronto hit Rabbit Hole may look like another bereaved parent drama, but as adapted by David Lindsay-Abaire from his Pulitzer-prize-winning play, directed by John Cameron Mitchell (Hedwig & the Angry Inch), and acted by Nicole Kidman, Aaron Eckhart and Dianne Wiest, it's a stunning piece of work. While the movie doesn't open until December 17, I think this one will go all the way: critics groups, Golden Globes, Guilds, Oscars: picture, adapted screenplay, actress, supporting actress.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • October 25, 2010 4:15 AM
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  • 2 Comments

Oscar Round-Up: The Social Network Leads Buzz, Bullock vs. Lane, Renner's a Star

Oscar Round-Up: The Social Network Leads Buzz, Bullock vs. Lane, Renner's a Star
As awards season heats up and the growing surge of Oscar pundits weigh in more frequently, every Thursday the Daily Read will round up their worthiest efforts. And every Friday, as usual, we post the Oscar Talk podcast: this week we welcome London Fest attendees Guy Lodge (In Contention) and Peter Knegt (indieWIRE).
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • October 14, 2010 7:02 AM
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  • 1 Comment

Oscar Watch: King's Speech Leads Gurus 'O Gold, Wins Hamptons Prize

Oscar Watch: King's Speech Leads Gurus 'O Gold, Wins Hamptons Prize
Tom Hooper’s The King’s Speech, starring Colin Firth as a stuttering King George VI, not only won the narrative audience prize at the Hamptons International Film Festival Sunday, but scored number one in the post-Toronto Film Festival Gurus 'o Gold poll (below). I also voted it number one (my current predictions are here and listed below), because the Tom Hooper movie is not only impeccably made and boasts the year's likely best actor winner (Firth), but is emotionally moving in a way that the brilliantly cold The Social Network is not.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • October 11, 2010 3:33 AM
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  • 7 Comments

Oscar Talk: Diane Lane vs. Annette Bening vs. Julianne Moore, Inception, Hereafter, The Way Back

Oscar Talk: Diane Lane vs. Annette Bening vs. Julianne Moore, Inception, Hereafter, The Way Back
There's still a long way to go in the Oscar race. Kris Tapley and I debate whether Secretariat is this year's mainstream Blind Side, Diane Lane is this year's Sandra Bullock, Julianne Moore and Annette Bening will both make it for The Kids Are All Right, and if Chris Nolan's Inception, John Cameron Mitchell's Rabbit Hole, Martin Scorsese's Shutter Island, Pixar's Toy Story 3, Peter Weir's The Way Back, and Clint Eastwood's Hereafter have a shot at the top ten.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • October 9, 2010 1:39 AM
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  • 2 Comments

The Great Gatsby: Pitt vs. Pitt, Mulligan vs. Portman, Casting Poll

- The rumored Great Gatsby remake isn't that far along, it seems. While Deadline sets the record straight on the project's future--the remake might be Baz Luhrmann's next picture, but so might an original musical at Media Rights Capital--the movie does inspire juicy casting ideas.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • October 4, 2010 8:20 AM
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  • 9 Comments

The Social Network's Treatment of Women, Winterbottom's Kercher Murder Mystery to Star Firth

-It's no surprise that David Fincher and Aaron Sorkin's The Social Network is getting Oscar-buzz, zeitgeist hype and debates about what is fact and fiction. Now the role of women in the film is kicking up controversy. The Daily Beast's Rebecca Davis O'Brien argues that the femme roles are props in a film that "not only reflects its era, but will shape it." Stephen Colbert declares that there are no women of substance in the movie except for the small roles of lawyer Rashida Jones and Zuckerberg's scorning girlfriend Rooney Mara. The women in the movie are seen as liabilities, writes Jezebel, if not woefully disrespected.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • October 4, 2010 6:28 AM
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  • 8 Comments

TIFF: Genre Films Sell in Toronto Buying Spree

As TIFF wound down, the weekend sale of Will Ferrell's $6 million dark comedy Everything Must Go to Lionsgate/Roadside marked a more frenetic Toronto sales market than last year, when many sales took months to close. Horror film Insidious also sold, to Sony Worldwide Acquisitions Group, probably for 2011 Screen Gems release. "It's a genre distributor's wet dream," says IM Global's Stuart Ford, who wasn't worried about landing North American distribs for these and two more titles at Toronto this year--all were modestly-budgeted and pre-sold in foreign territories. "The market is still challenging, but healthier than it was a year ago. There's more supply and demand. While you're not seeing many movies sell on the spot, the stronger material is likely to find the right distribution home."
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • September 19, 2010 5:16 AM
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  • 0 Comments

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