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Thompson on Hollywood

Tarantino Speaks on Django Unchained

New York Vulture questioned Quentin Tarantino at the Film Society of Lincoln Center tribute to Sidney Poitier. Tarantino refused to confirm any casting for Django Unchained, including Christoph Waltz, and admitted that the script he finished last Tuesday and handed in to the Weinstein Co. was 366 pages long (that's wrong, I've got a 168-page script). A slight trim may be in order before Tarantino gets the green light. It's unlikely that the Weinstein Co., as well as they did with Inglourious Basterds (worldwide gross: $320 million) at 153 minutes, will want the movie to be quite that long.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • May 3, 2011 6:01 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Tarantino's Next Movie is Black Western Django Unchained CONFIRMED AND UPDATED

Tarantino's Next Movie is Black Western Django Unchained CONFIRMED AND UPDATED
Quentin Tarantino has handed in the final draft of his spaghetti western script Django Unchained to Weinstein Co., his agency WME confirms. According to Tarantino Archives, the title Django Unchained pays homage to both the Sergio Corbucci original Django, not to mention Takashi Miike's Sukiyaki Western Django, which features Tarantino (see clips for both below). UPDATE: Another long-rumored inspiration, once optioned by Miramax, was Elmore Leonard's 40 Lashes Less One.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • April 30, 2011 4:13 AM
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  • 10 Comments

Summer Preview: Must-Sees on Big Screen, Skippable, Must-to-Avoid

Summer Preview: Must-Sees on Big Screen, Skippable, Must-to-Avoid
The summer is upon us, with a plethora of viewing choices, many of them utterly avoidable. I lay out the summer movie landscape.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • April 28, 2011 9:46 AM
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  • 7 Comments

Interview Watch: Michelle Williams Talks Career, Harrison Ford on CGI, Gabriel Byrne on Catholicism

- In their May issue, Interview Magazine asks Meek's Cutoff star Michelle Williams about her selective and seemingly wise career choices. Williams responds:"How do I say this? It’s like a mechanism in my life that runs on its own. When other things in my life don’t, and are broken and aren’t going well, for some reason my decision-making mechanism has a little engine of its own, and it’s fine. So I don’t overthink it. I’ve come to learn that the choices I labor over and go back and forth about and ask a million people for their opinions and make lists about...those are always the wrong choices. I’ve definitely made a couple of those, and that’s how I know now that it’s not the best way for me to decide…I don’t think of it as building, or really even a career. It’s just what appeals to me right now, without any real thought about how it’s going to affect my future, or even how it relates to my past work. I have faith in the fact that, as I change, so will the things that I’m interested in, as long as I keep up my own change."
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • April 26, 2011 7:09 AM
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  • 2 Comments

SFIFF 54 Day Two: Movies Directed by Women, Miss Representation, The Good Life, Meek's Cutoff

San Francisco TOH corespondent Meredith Brody continues her daily diary from the The San Francisco International Film Festival:If you’re one of the all-access-pass members of a film festival audience, intent on seeing as many movies during its brief annual flowering as possible, one of your main goals is avoiding the fate of the woman who sat in front of me on opening night.
  • By Meredith Brody
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  • April 23, 2011 8:37 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Meek's Cutoff: Professor Kelly Reichardt's Filmmaking 101 Primer

Meek's Cutoff: Professor Kelly Reichardt's Filmmaking 101 Primer
Kelly Reichardt teaches filmmaking at Bard College in New York, and writes and directs rigorous low-budget indie films on the side. Her latest, Meek's Cutoff, is even better than her last, Wendy and Lucy, which was better than Old Joy, which I found a tough slog. Star Michelle Williams may have made some of the difference on the last two, but perhaps in spite of herself, Reichardt's austere, thoughtful films are gaining accessibility as she goes along. In person, she's seriously charming. Herewith, Professor Reichardt's tips for making a good indie movie:
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • April 21, 2011 8:19 AM
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  • 1 Comment

EW Movie Preview Shares Soundbites from Hollywood's Summer Stars

EW's Summer Movie Preview issue is out April 15. Here's just some of the buzz they share from Hollywood's stars:
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • April 14, 2011 5:53 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Revivals: The Return of Schwarzenegger and the Western

Remakes and reboots are a dime a dozen these days, but roots run deeper for some more than others. Arnold Schwarzenegger, 63, is getting back to work. And having been pronounced dead, the western genre is being welcomed by a new generation in both classic and hybrid forms.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • March 7, 2011 9:14 AM
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  • 1 Comment

Rango, Adjustment Bureau, Beastly, Take Me Home Tonight, I Saw the Devil: Blockbuster Weekend?

2011 is due for its first blockbuster weekend. From Johnny Depp's animated Rango and Matt Damon and Emily Blunt's The Adjustment Bureau to teen flick Beastly, 80s throwback Take Me Home Tonight and Korean horror film I Saw the Devil, all the demographic bases are covered. We recommend Damon and Blunt's effortless on-screen chemistry, the wondrously imaginative Rango, and indie festival favorites Abel and Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives. Film details, reviews and trailers are below.
  • By Sophia Savage
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  • March 4, 2011 8:30 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Meek's Cutoff Early Reviews: "Beckettian Harshness," Williams Is "Show-Stealingly Brilliant"

Kelly Reichardt's austere western Meek's Cutoff hits theatres April 8. A roundup of early reviews is below.
  • By Anne Thompson
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  • March 3, 2011 6:25 AM
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  • 0 Comments

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