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Tarantino and 'Django Unchained' Gang Hit Comic-Con: How Serious is This Movie?

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood July 16, 2012 at 1:56PM

Saturday morning Comic-Con's cavernous Hall H was packed with 6000 fans, many of whom stayed up all night to gain a seat, to get a gander at an eight-minute sizzle reel of clips from the first half of Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained" (slated optimistically for release by Weinstein Co. on December 25).
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Christoph Waltz
Christoph Waltz

Saturday morning Comic-Con's cavernous Hall H was packed with 6000 fans, many of whom stayed up all night to gain a seat, to get a gander at an eight-minute sizzle reel of clips from the first half of Quentin Tarantino's "Django Unchained" (slated optimistically for release by Weinstein Co. on December 25).

Clearly, the film's marketers are reaching directly for fans--with an expanded budget from "Inglourious Basterds"'s $70 million demanding more than an art-house audience turnout. With a week of filming still to go, "Django" won't be finished in time to gain the benefit of the fall film festival circuit.

What the footage shown in Cannes and San Diego reveals is that while Tarantino has described the film as a "southern," it's a bang-up western, packed with physical comedy and bloody action and hell-bent revenge. And yes, it looks like a classic widescreen Sergio Leone western, even if the setting is New Orleans and Mississippi two years before the Civil War. (The music ranges from classic Johnny Cash to James Brown. No Ennio Morricone--so far.)
 

Jamie Foxx
Jamie Foxx

We see a sophisticated German, Dr. King Schultz ("Inglourious Basterds" star Christoph Waltz), approach a chain gang and attempt to buy one of the slaves. When the guards don't go along with this idea, he shoots them both and literally releases Django from his chains. He is now a free man. While Schultz poses as a dentist, with a big molar swaying on top of his horse and buggy, he's actually a bounty hunter. He needs Django to identify some pretty nasty slave drivers he knows only too well, and Django is eager to help him. Don Johnson plays plantation owner Big Daddy; watching Django stalk across the grounds to shoot one of the men who abused him is chilling. He whips another to death. He also wants to find his wife, Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), who is owned by another piece of work, plantation owner Candie (a beefy Leonardo Di Caprio, with long greasy hair). (Hall H panel and flip cam videos with Foxx, Washington, Waltz and Goggins are below.)

Schultz, appalled by southern America's racist ways, tries to protect Django, who blooms under his tutelage and turns out to be a pretty good shot. Tarantino is taking the revenge western to a whole new level as the two bounty hunters shoot their way through the unsuspecting South. It looks like the first Leone-esque section of "Inglourious Basterds," and it's about fighting injustice, except that this time it's not Brad Pitt against the Nazis in World War II--it's an angry black man getting his own back from racist white southerners before the Civil War.

Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino

As with many of Tarantino's projects, "Django" had been bubbling on the back burner for a while, 13 years, he told Hall H. “I’ve always wanted to do a western. Spaghetti westerns have always been my favorite. The violence, the surrealism, the cool music and all that stuff. The initial germ of the whole idea was a slave who becomes a bounty hunter and then goes after overseers who are hiding out on plantations.”

Tarantino said that adding the long-missing ingredient--slavery--to the familiar western tropes made it fresh, finally. The crowd loved it when Tarantino described the movie as a prequel to "Shaft": "Broomhilda and Django will eventually have a baby and then that baby will have a baby and that baby will have a baby and one of these days, John Shaft will be born. John Shaft started with this lady here. They’re the great great great great grandparents of 'shut your mouth!'”

This article is related to: Comic-Con, The Weinstein Co., Weinsteins, Django Unchained, Jamie Foxx, Quentin Tarantino, Quentin Tarantino


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.