Click to Skip Ad
Closing in...

New Yorker on The Arduous Making of the Wachowskis' 'Cloud Atlas'

Thompson on Hollywood By Maggie Lange | Thompson on Hollywood September 4, 2012 at 2:10PM

In the most recent New Yorker, Aleksandar Hemon details the fantastical movie that almost wasn't: the Wachowskis' adaptation of David Mitchell's 2004 enigmatic novel, "Cloud Atlas." The article lists an array of hold ups while making the movie: Halle Berry's broken foot while shooting in Mallorca, studio hesitancy, and terrible weather...
2
Cloud Atlas

In the most recent New Yorker, Aleksandar Hemon details the fantastical movie that almost wasn't: the Wachowskis' adaptation of David Mitchell's 2004 enigmatic novel, "Cloud Atlas."  The article lists an array of hold ups while making the movie: Halle Berry's broken foot while shooting in Mallorca, studio hesitancy, and terrible weather.  This is not to mention puzzling source material: "Cloud Atlas" includes six plot threads divided across centuries and cosmically connected.  Mitchell has even said of his work, "As I was writing 'Cloud Atlas,' I thought, It's a shame this is unfilmable."

After meeting with the Wachowskis and co-director Tom Tykwer ("Run Lola Run"), the author changed his mind.  He soon realized that there was potential for the film to be better than the book.

Hemon's feature describes the obstacles faced by "Cloud Atlas" as poetic, and posits that "In the Wachowski's work, the forces of evil are often overwhelming powerful, inflicting misery on humans, who maintain their faith until they're saved by an unexpected miracle. The story of the making of 'Cloud Atlas' fits this narrative trajectory pretty well."

Hamon's feature is available for purchase here. "Cloud Atlas" will premiere at Toronto before opening nationwide on October 26. Watch the trailer below:


E-Mail Updates








Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.