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'Holy Motors' Trailer, Review ("bonkers, delirious, pretentious"); Carax Q & A (VIDEO)

Thompson on Hollywood By Maggie Lange | Thompson on Hollywood October 21, 2012 at 2:20PM

Indomina has released an exhilarating U.S. trailer for Leos Carax's "Holy Motors," which debuted on the fest circuit last May in Cannes (where it did not score a prize) and wound up playing Fantastic Fest as well as New York, which tells you something. Matt Mueller's review calls the film "bonkers" and "equal parts delirious and pretentious." Indiewire's Eric Kohn draws some answers out of the notoriously press shy Carax here.
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"Holy Motors"
Indomina "Holy Motors"

Indomina has released an exhilarating U.S. trailer (below) for Leos Carax's return to cinema after 13 years, "Holy Motors," which debuted on the fest circuit last May in Cannes (where it did not score a prize) and wound up playing Fantastic Fest as well as the august New York Film Festival, which tells you something.

Much like "Cosmopolis," the film traces Monsieur Oscar (Denis Lavant) as he tours Paris in a limousine to a series of nine "appointments."  At each, he morphs into another character -- from an industrial magnate to a gypsy, ninja warrior, reptilian sex god, forlorn father, thwarted lover, and so on.  The film changes tone and shape-shifts through genre with each character transformation.

Also starring Edith Scob, Kylie Minogue, and Eva Mendes, "Holy Motors" opened in New York October 17 and expands to more cities on November 9.

Matt Mueller's review calls the film "bonkers" and "equal parts delirious and pretentious." Indiewire's Eric Kohn interviews the notoriously press-shy Carax here:

I spent so little time imagining the film. The whole thing took two weeks. It was a race. I didn't watch my dailies, I didn't read exactly what I was doing. I only went over it at the editing table. Although I don't make films for anybody, I do make films, therefore I do make them for someone: I make them for the dead. But then I show them to living people that I start to think about while I'm editing -- who'll watch them? So I start to get more reflexive at the editing table. Why did I imagine this science-fiction word? I did invent a genre that doesn't exist. But I don't have the real answers.

This article is related to: Video, Trailers, Trailers, Reviews, Reviews, Interviews, Interviews


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