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Trailers from Hell: Joe Dante Says 'The Devil and Daniel Webster' Features the Greatest Satanic Performance of All Time

Photo of Trailers From Hell By Trailers From Hell | Thompson on Hollywood May 18, 2012 at 5:53PM

Director Joe Dante ("Gremlins") and co-creator of Trailers from Hell guides us through today's Trailer From Hell feature: 1941's "The Devil and Daniel Webster." Dante claims this movie contains "probably one of the greatest satanic performances of all time."
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All That Money Can Buy

Director Joe Dante ("Gremlins") and co-creator of Trailers from Hell guides us through today's Trailer From Hell feature: 1941's "The Devil and Daniel Webster."  Dante claims this movie contains "probably one of the greatest satanic performances of all time."  Originally titled, "All That Money Can Buy," the film has been long ignored, neglected, and poorly edited later on.

Here's the synopsis from the Trailers from Hell post:

A classic piece of Americana. William Dieterle's haunting fantasy is that rarity, a major studio art film. It's had a rocky ride over the decades but is now available uncut on DVD after years of neglect, recuts and spotty distribution under a myriad of titles, including "All That Money Can Buy," "Here is a Man," "A Certain Mr. Scratch," and "Daniel and the Devil." As the Satan's smolderingly sexy consort, a pre-Cat People Simone Simon must have made quite an impression on Val Lewton. Alec Baldwin directed and starred in an updated remake in 2003, which was finally released in 2007 as "Shortcut to Happiness" with Baldwin's name removed.

Our other Trailers from Hell features this week - on Monday we showed Brian Trenchard Smith on "Daughters of Darkness," and on Wednesday, Dan Ireland gave the talk over for "The Lair of the White Worm."
 

This article is related to: Trailers, Horror


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.