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Will Tribeca's Future of Film Blog Catch On?

Photo of Anne Thompson By Anne Thompson | Thompson on Hollywood April 4, 2011 at 11:08AM

I commend the Tribeca Film Festival for trying to explore the edges of how to mount a truly interactive film festival. Now the Fest has launched "The Future of Film Blog," a great idea if they know where to take it from here. Blogs don't work unless they have an authentic mission, a strong recognizable voice and are regularly fed. All of that requires commitment of time, energy and manpower to create vibrant new content that will stimulate a community response.
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Thompson on Hollywood

I commend the Tribeca Film Festival for trying to explore the edges of how to mount a truly interactive film festival. Now the Fest has launched "The Future of Film Blog," a great idea if they know where to take it from here. Blogs don't work unless they have an authentic mission, a strong recognizable voice and are regularly fed. All of that requires commitment of time, energy and manpower to create vibrant new content that will stimulate a community response.

Tribeca leader Geoffrey Gilmore's first entry, "How the Internet is Changing the Film Festival Experience" is serviceable, admirable, earnest, and self-serving. Same with Peter Guber, who has a new book to promote. Magnolia's Todd Wagner is a smart cookie who sees the digital future, but again, he's serving his own agenda.

Either really let these folks let down their hair (as Ted Hope does at indieWIRE), or admit that journalism is required: sometimes it takes an outsider (who understands the game, hopefully) to artfully arbitrate, mediate, and God forbid, edit raw material in such a way that the stuff makes a compelling read.

I wish them well, but...

This article is related to: Festivals, Stuck In Love, Digital Future, Tribeca, Bloggers


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.