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WATCH: Melissa McCarthy Hosts SNL, Farewell to Seth Meyers

Thompson on Hollywood By Maggie Lange | Thompson on Hollywood February 2, 2014 at 12:51PM

Melissa McCarthy hosts SNL for the third time--and faces some type-casting.
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Melissa McCarthy SNL

Melissa McCarthy hosted "Saturday Night Live" for the third time last night, and despite her seasoned experience and warm humor, she couldn't quite rescue the half-baked sketches. The opening skit reworked the Super Bowl halftime show as a Broadway musical about football playoffs. It was a questionable idea, with too little follow-through. McCarthy's monologue was also inexplicable; she and Bobby Moynihan harnessed up and battled each other in a "Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon"-esque fight. 

The show happily employed McCarthy in many sketches, but continued to cast her as an aggressive, coarse, and blundering character--save for playing a goofy lady talking about online dating in the always fun "Girlfriends Talk Show." Yes, McCarthy played a rib-scarfing homeless woman, a rude cable lady, a murder on the path for vengeance, and an unstable, vulgar game show contestant. Of course, McCarthy has proven in her latest blockbusters that she's somehow lovable while playing a combative and crass character, but SNL would be a perfect opportunity for her to branch away from this typecasting. 

The most satisfying part of evening was not a sketch, but rather a warm goodbye to Seth Meyers, on his way to replace Jimmy Fallon on "Late Night." Cecily Strong, his current Weekend Update co-host, bid him farewell along with former SNL favorites, Amy Poehler and Bill Hader (as Stefon), and Andy Samberg. 

Watch this and other highlights below:

This article is related to: SNL, Television, Television, TV Reviews, TV, Melissa McCarthy


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.