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Weekend Recap: Hollywood's Most Secretive Directors, Cinema's Future, Tina Brown, AMC vs. Dish

Thompson on Hollywood By Maggie Lange | Thompson on Hollywood October 22, 2012 at 2:35PM

Secretive directors: In a world where new posters, trailers, and spoilers are prized and rumors are updated minute-by-minute, remaining a "secretive" director takes willpower and determination. A select few directors manage to keep a tight lid on their projects, and Vulture's Kyle Buchanan posted a list of the most clandestine of these. Hollywood's most secretive filmmakers? Christopher Nolan, Woody Allen, and the Wachowskis...
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Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan

Secretive directors: In a world where new posters, trailers, and spoilers are prized and rumors are updated minute-by-minute, remaining a "secretive" director takes willpower and determination. A select few directors manage to keep a tight lid on their projects, and Vulture's Kyle Buchanan posted a list of the most clandestine of these. Hollywood's most secretive filmmakers? Christopher Nolan, Woody Allen, and the Wachowskis, who until "Cloud Atlas" never even spoke to the press. (Our interview with them is coming soon.)

Cinema's future: The Financial Times' Peter Aspden meditates on three new books about the "future" of cinema:  David Thomson’s "The Big Screen," David Denby’s "Do the Movies Have a Future?" and "Film After Film," by J. Hoberman.  Aspden sums it up clearly - these three writers "wonder where the future of cinema may take us. They do so by writing about the past."  More of Aspden's reviews here.

TinaBrown

Newsweek's  future:  Tina Brown explains what's happening to Newsweek after last week's announcement that the magazine would cease print publication in 2013.  “In the last 12 months, I'd had to adjust in myself,” she told the National Journal. “I've always been a great print junky. …But my own habits have changed so dramatically.”

AMC vs. Dish: Lucky for "Walking Dead" fans, AMC settled it legal battle with Dish, just in time for the just-launched new season of their zombie drama. Dish will pay $700 million in cash for the distribution deal, according to Sunday's settlement.  Starting July 1, Dish had ceased broadcasting AMC after difficult negotiations.  More about the heated negotiations at Mashable.

Outdated-tech in movies:  Wired's Cade Metz wrote a comical round-up of outdated technology in movies: "The Most Wonderfully Ridiculous Movie Computers of All Time."  I'm waiting for the clunky cell phone version of this article.

'Desk Set,' 1957.
'Desk Set,' 1957.

This article is related to: Media, New Media & Technology, Chris Nolan, Wachowskis, Woody Allen, Woody Allen, Critics, Books


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.