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Woody Allen's DGA Speech: Says Awards Fall Somewhere Between Nobel Prize & Republican Primary

Thompson on Hollywood By Sophia Savage | Thompson on Hollywood January 31, 2012 at 2:36PM

Woody Allen wasn't present at the DGA awards, where "The Artist" director Michel Hazanavicius was the big winner, but that didn't stop him from stealing the show with a suitably neurotic speech via video. It went like this:
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Woody Allen on the set of "Midnight in Paris"
Woody Allen on the set of "Midnight in Paris"

Woody Allen wasn't present at the DGA awards, where "The Artist" director Michel Hazanavicius was the big winner, but that didn't stop him from stealing the show with a suitably neurotic speech via video. It went like this:

Hi. I just wanted to express my gratitude for this. I was astonished when I saw my name on the list of all these illustrious directors. My first reaction was that it was a typo, that some poor guy was going to be fired because he stuck my name on it by accident. When I found out it was legitimate, I tried to keep it in perspective, to assess where I put the Directors’ Guild as far as awards go. I thought it was somewhere between the top of the spectrum, which would be, let’s say, the Nobel Prize, and the bottom of the barrel, which would be, let’s say, uh, the Republican Primary. … You may be asking yourselves, if he’s so happy and so grateful, why isn’t he here? I’m not there because I knew if I came, I would have to mingle, and I don’t hold up in person. … From 3,000 miles away, I can appear more intelligent, but in actual social situations, I can’t keep up my end of the conversation. I drift. I’m the only guy who is short, and wears tweed clothing with elbow patches, and with black rimmed glasses, and is Jewish — but not smart.

This article is related to: Awards, Directors, Woody Allen


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.