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IMDb and Kindle Partner on X-Ray for Movies

Thompson on Hollywood By Maggie Lange | Thompson on Hollywood September 10, 2012 at 2:44PM

IMDb and Amazon's Kindle Fire proudly introduce a useful interruption during your feature presentation: "X-Ray for Movies." By tapping on the screen of a movie, the user will be able to see the names and filmographies of each of the actors. The X-Ray program, exclusive to Kindle Fire at the moment, is backed with over 100 million data items from IMDb's resources. What does IMDb's founder and CEO, Col Needham have to say about this? That it's a revolution, twenty years in the making. “X-Ray for Movies revolutionizes the way we watch movies," Needham stated in a press release, "This is the culmination of everything we’ve been working on for over twenty years and is the result of a combination of sophisticated technology and old-fashioned hard work. "
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IMDb 'X-Ray for Movies' Hard at Work Over 'The Hunger Games'
IMDb 'X-Ray for Movies' Hard at Work Over 'The Hunger Games'

A useful tool or a distraction?

IMDb and Amazon's Kindle Fire are bringing us "X-Ray for Movies." Tap on the screen of a movie page, and you can see the names and filmographies of each of the actors. The X-Ray program, exclusive to Kindle Fire, is backed with over 100 million data items from IMDb's resources.

IMDb founder and CEO Col Needham says it's a revolution twenty years in the making: “X-Ray for Movies revolutionizes the way we watch movies. This is the culmination of everything we’ve been working on for over twenty years and is the result of a combination of sophisticated technology and old-fashioned hard work. "

This article is related to: IMDB, Amazon, New Media & Technology


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Thompson on Hollywood

Born and raised in Manhattan, Anne Thompson grew up going to the Thalia and The New Yorker and wound up at grad Cinema Studies at NYU. She worked at United Artists and Film Comment before heading west as that magazine's west coast editor. She wrote for the LA Weekly, Sight and Sound, Empire, The New York Times and Entertainment Weekly before serving as West Coast Editor of Premiere. She wrote for The Washington Post, The London Observer, Wired, More, and Vanity Fair, and did staff stints at The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. She eventually took her blog Thompson on Hollywood to Indiewire. She taught film criticism at USC Critical Studies, and continues to host the fall semester of “Sneak Previews” for UCLA Extension.