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First Poster Art for Zhang Yimou's Oscar Hopeful Flowers of War with Christian Bale Not Inspired

by Anne Thompson
September 26, 2011 7:41 AM
2 Comments
  • |
Thompson on Hollywood

Picking the right poster art is an art in itself, and China's treatment for its official Oscar submission, Zhang Yimou's $90 million The Flowers Of War, leaves much to be desired.

I saw 20 minutes of footage at the Toronto Film Festival, where the producers were seeking to sell the film, which stars Christian Bale as a guy who becomes the reluctant saviour to a group of innocent school girls as well as some hardened prostitutes who take refuge at a cathedral during the horrific 1937 Nanking massacre. Ideally the filmmakers want to close a deal with a North American distributor in time for a year-end Oscar-qualifying release. The film opens December 16 in Asia. Finding the right home would help to find the right way to position the film, which will require delicate handling.

Full poster below.

Thompson on Hollywood

[poster via ThePlaylist]

2 Comments

  • J. Sperling Reich | September 26, 2011 12:49 PMReply

    I have to agree. This one sheet for Flowers Of War is rather lacking. Though, the poster is geared toward a Chinese audience, and with that cultural context in mind, it is similar to many one sheet's for Chinese films.

  • The Pope | September 26, 2011 9:56 AMReply

    Not good at all. Seems like they forgot to employ a stills-photographer and gave two frames to some kid who was using Photoshop for the first time.

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