Women and Hollywood


Melissa Silverstein is the founder and editor of Women and Hollywood, one of the most respected sites for issues related to women and film as well as other areas of pop culture. Women and Hollywood educates, advocates, and agitates for gender parity across the entertainment industry.

She is also the co-founder and Artistic Director of The Athena Film Festival. The 4th annual festival took place from February 6-9, 2014 at Barnard College in NYC.

Melissa recently published the first book from Women and Hollywood, In Her Voice: Women Directors Talk Directing, which is a compilation of over 40 interviews that have appeared on the site.

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Women and Hollywood

TV: Latina Women Demand SNL Hire Latina Comedienne After Offensive Caricature

#StillNoLatinas was launched after the March 8 episode, which featured an airheaded beauty-pageant type named Marisol who spoke English loudly and poorly.
  • By Inkoo Kang
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  • March 28, 2014 1:01 PM
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  • 4 Comments

TV: Trailer Watch: Emily Mortimer's New HBO Sitcom About Female Friendship

Thankfully, it'll be nothing like "The Newsroom."
  • By Inkoo Kang
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  • February 28, 2014 12:00 PM
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  • 0 Comments

TV: Six More Makers Docs to Air on PBS This Summer

PBS will air six documentaries about women's progress in the divergent fields of war, space, comedy, business, Hollywood, and politics starting in June.
  • By Inkoo Kang
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  • January 22, 2014 11:30 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Sundance Women Directors: Meet Gillian Robespierre

"We were frustrated by the limited representations of young women's experience with pregnancy, let alone growing up. We were waiting to see a more honest film, or at least, a story that was closer to many of the stories we knew. We weren't sure how long that wait was going to be, so we decided to tell the story ourselves."
  • By Melissa Silverstein
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  • January 17, 2014 12:00 PM
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  • 0 Comments

Why Judd Apatow Directing Amy Schumer in Trainwreck is a Great Thing

Apatow is a boy's man, but, unlike so many of the male movers and shakers in Hollywood, he's also remaking himself into a women's mentor.
  • By Inkoo Kang
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  • January 10, 2014 11:00 AM
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  • 0 Comments

Black Comedienne Sasheer Zamata Joins SNL

Sasheer Zamata became the most famous performer on "Saturday Night Live" yesterday when the show announced her addition to the cast.
  • By Inkoo Kang
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  • January 7, 2014 1:12 PM
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  • 0 Comments

TV: New Black Comedienne to Join SNL (Finally)

Public protests from castmembers, widespread media scrutiny, and the existence of many talented black comediennes have finally convinced longtime SNL producer Lorne Michaels to add an African-American funnywoman to the cast.
  • By Inkoo Kang
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  • December 13, 2013 2:30 PM
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  • 1 Comment

Guest Post: The Evolution of Women in Comedy: From Mary Tyler Moore to Amy and Mindy

Treva Silverman had spent most of her 30 years wanting to be funny and female -- and allowed to do so in public, maybe even collect a buck or two for her trouble. Growing up in the 1950s in Cedarhurst, Long Island, she'd looked up to Carole Lombard and Jean Arthur, those grand dames of '30s screwball comedies, then she'd discovered, via Dorothy Parker, the idea of writing comedy for a living.
  • By Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
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  • July 17, 2013 12:30 PM
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  • 1 Comment

Cross Post: Okay, Jen. Here Goes: "Stop Being Mean To Women On The Internet"

My fellow comedian Jen Kirkman is boycotting Twitter until men stop using it as a medium to be awful to her because she’s a woman yet still has the audacity to express her views on occasion. Or more specifically, until her male counterparts speak up against this kind of treatment.
  • By DC Pierson
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  • December 7, 2012 11:16 AM
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  • 2 Comments

Book Excerpt We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy: A Very Oral History

The first time I ever heard the statement “women aren’t funny” was while reading it in a Christopher Hitchens’s column in the January 2007 issue of Vanity Fair. At the time, I was more confused by it than anything. As a kid, I’d remembered seeing a lot of funny women in the movies and TV shows that I loved. I also knew a lot of funny women. So I put the piece down and moved on.
  • By Yael Kohen
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  • October 26, 2012 4:33 PM
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  • 0 Comments

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