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Tribeca Women Directors: Meet Sabine Lubbe Bakker (Ne Me Quitte Pas)

Women and Hollywood By Melissa Silverstein | Women and Hollywood April 18, 2014 at 4:00PM

"Since the friendship between the two protagonists is ruthless, and therefore beautifully honest, I too had to accept we can't always 'fix' things."
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Still from "Ne Me Quitte Pas"
Still from "Ne Me Quitte Pas"

Filmmaker Sabine Lubbe Bakker was born and raised in Antwerp, Belgium, and has studied in The Netherlands and Brazil. Her credits include the award-winning documentary Shout (2010), Power to the People (2012), and Hotel Europe (2013). Her lastest film, which she co-directed with Niels van Koevorden, is Ne Me Quitte Pas. (Press materials)

Ne Me Quitte Pas will debut at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 18.

Please give us your description of the film playing.

My film is called Ne Me Quitte Pas. It is set in Wallonia, in the south of Belgium. Two friends, Bob and Marcel, share their solitude, sense of humor, and craving for alcohol. It is a tragicomic ode to failure. 

What drew you to this story?

The idea that in a place where nothing happens, everything happens. The embrace of failure, as in the acceptance of painful situations. There is more humor and humanity [in failure] than in success.

What was the biggest challenge?

Being okay with the tragedies of the main characters. Since the friendship between the two protagonists is ruthless, and therefore beautifully honest, I too had to accept we can't always "fix" things. 

What advice do you have for other female directors?

Work hard and without compromise. No guts, no glory. 

Do you have any thoughts on what are the biggest challenges and/or opportunities for the future with the changing distribution mechanisms for films?


In Europe it is probably soon the end of TV as we know it. In general, TV broadcasters are still providing big chunks of their budget to films. I do not necessarily think that this change is a bad thing, by the way. 

Another thing is the amount of work one has to put in to finding your audience. Crowdfunding for financing the production and/or distribution is one thing, but to do it effectively, I think it is a trade on its own. 

Name your favorite women directed film and why. 

The first one that comes to mind now is the film The Arbor by Clio Bernard. I'm very keen on fiction/documentary crossovers, and this construction in a construction in a construction was something that is very inspiring to think about [with regard to] what I do.

This article is related to: Women Directors, Interviews, Documentary, Tribeca Film Festival, Sabine Lubbe Bakker, Ne Me Quitte Pas